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I love this phrase as it pertains to so many aspects of our lives - what we do at work, resolving disputes, our personal health and wellbeing, our fitness, our happiness and environment factors such as climate change to name a few.

Written by Denise Evans

For many of us the process of law making may seem irrelevant and often we won’t care unless something happens which impacts directly on us. 

Written by Nurit Zubery, winner of the Fair Way Resolution Anne Scragg Scholarship 2019
 

Fair Way Resolution Limited is an organisation centred around leading the prevention and resolution of disputes. As part of our commitment to leading best practice dispute resolution, we award an annual scholarship package for anyone working in or studying dispute resolution in New Zealand. 

Each applicant is required to submit a short abstract for a proposed paper on a dispute resolution topic of their choice. Up to five applicants are shortlisted and invited to prepare a full 1,500 word paper.
 

The 2019 winner of the Fair Way Resolution Anne Scragg Scholarship is Nurit Zubery.

Born and raised in Israel, Nurit studied law at Tel-Aviv University and worked as a lawyer in the areas of litigation, commercial and employment law, prior to moving to NZ in 1999 where she has owned and managed two successful businesses. In more recent years, Nurit has been exploring her passion in mediation. She studied at the Massey University Dispute Resolution Programme, before beginning an LLM at the University of Auckland.

Continuing my theme of well-being this article presents mental health as a skill. Any skill is learned and practised in order to learn it.  It’s refined and further refined, and with practice it starts to become second nature, a default position that becomes easier to do. “Doing mental health” is something we can learn and practice and as we get better at it, so we are able cope with the life’s challenges, make necessary changes and thrive.

Written by Dr Claire Achmad from Barnardos and Keri Morris from Fair Way -

This article appears in the September 2019 version of The Family Advocate.

Introduction

Written by Nora McGlinchey